Tarangire National Park is in northern Tanzania, just south of Lake Manyara. This is a protected area of colossal baobabs, grassy plains, and huge herds of elephants. The park is one of the most underrated of Tanzania’s attractions, receiving just a fraction of the Serengeti’s visitors, which means more space and exclusivity for those who do make it to Tarangire.

As well as 300-strong herds of elephants, visitors will find big groups of buffalo and healthy populations of lions and leopards. During the dry season, Tarangire has the highest concentration of mammals in the country. There are wild dogs and rare antelope such as gerenuk, plus more than 550 species of birds to spot throughout the year.

Why visit the Tarangire National Park?

IT IS A GOOD CHOICE FOR TRAVELLERS WHO WISH TO ENCOUNTER MORE ANIMALS AND FEWER TOURISTS WHILE ON SAFARI.

One of the lesser-known game reserves in Tanzania, Tarangire rivals the Serengeti in its great number and diversity of wildlife. It is a good choice for travelers who wish to encounter more animals and fewer tourists while on safari. The Tarangire National Park is known as a wonderful birding destination and also features large numbers of games, particularly during the dry season, when the Tarangire River is the only source of water in the area. The landscape is of particular interest too, due to the high number of scenic baobab trees.

Why Visit?

  • Embark on a walking safari and marvel at ancient baobabs.
  • Discover hundreds of ancient rock paintings in the vicinity of Kolo.
  • Tarangire is famous for having herds of up to 300 elephants.

An often-overlooked gem, Tarangire’s characteristic skyline, framed by the stubby branches of fat baobab trees, is the backdrop for superb game viewing, particularly in the winter months of the peak season. Its marshes, which dry out into verdant grassy fields during the dry season, draw great herds of elephant, buffalo, antelope, and other plains game.

Lion and other predators are frequently spotted. The park boasts over 500 species of birds, including some species endemic to Tanzania. Away from the busier north, the southern end of the park is home to camps that specialize in walking safaris, allowing their guests to immerse their senses in the experience of exploring the African bush on foot.